The Havanese Dog

A national dog of Cuba, the Havanese is a descendent of the Blanquito de la Habana. Both the Blanquito and their ancestor (Bichon Tenerife) are extinct, but used to be found in the Canary Islands. Over the years, the Havanese has been considered to be a mix of Bichon, Blanquito, and Poodle.

Size wise, the Havanese is quite small. They have a carried-over tail over its back, as well as ears that fold and drop. Their hair can look absolutely gorgeous thanks to its long, silky style. The Havanese also comes in a variety of colors, which is fitting considering their spirited personalities and curiosity. You can also distinguish the Havanese breed from others due to their springy gait.

This particular breed is considered to be a great companion dog, as well as a fun and loving family pet. In most cases, you can put them in any environment and they will be able to adapt very easily. However, they do need a social environment with human contact. If they are left in an isolated area for several hours, it will not do the Havanese justice.

 

Havanese Breed – The Toy Dog

When you look at a Havanese, the initial thought is that they appear to be a toy dog. Most of them will weigh between 7 to 13 pounds and reach as high as about a foot tall. While most toy dogs look fragile and delicate, the Havanese is a little sturdier. They also come across as being longer than tall due to their physique and longer ribcage.

The topline of the Havanese is slightly higher from withers to croup. This creates a straight alignment, but it isn’t level. It’s quite enjoyable to see them run, because they look a bit springy. This is because of their strong rear drive and shorter upper arms.

Havanese bred dogs do not have an appearance of being short or snippy. Their muzzles are full and it slightly tapers at the nose, while the skull is flat at the top and rounded in the back. When you move from foot to elbow, the Havanese offers a deep chest in the standing position. This provides a very pronounced look while in the standing position. You will also notice that the abdomen is tucked up and the ribs are well-sprung.

Almost every Havanese comes with dark brown eyes and lids shaped liked ovals, which comes with a black pigmentation. If you extend his or her ears, they will reach half-way to the nose, and arc upward at the base. However, the ears normally hang down on the sides of the head without being in the way of the face. When you look at a Havanese tail, it will never touch the back, even though the hair on his or her tail will fall on the body.

When grooming a Havanese, it’s a good idea to provide some trimming around the feet. This makes them look tidy, but otherwise they are untrimmed. If you plan on showing a Havanese in dog shows, don’t groom them the same you would other breeds. The judges will be disappointed that you did not provide them with the Havanese standard. Also, the tail cannot be docked, but it is possible to utilize head accessories above the eyes. If you’re just going to have your Havanese around the house, they will love it when you clip their hair short for better upkeep.

The Coat

Most well kept Havanese dogs offer a long, soft coat of hair. It’s extremely lightweight and can give off a silky appeal when managed appropriately. You will also notice that their coats are a bit wavy and undulating. Most breeds with double coats have a coarse and dense feel, but the Javanese’s outer coat is quite soft and fluffy. The irony of their long hair is that the undercoat might be absent. There is also the possibility that their coat will look more oily than silky. In fact, the downfall to their hair is that it can look frizzy.

Due to their roots, the Havanese breed’s coat is used as a sunshade and cooling agent. Even though it looks as though their hair would be too warm to handle on a hot day, it has the reverse effect on the Havanese. Plus, you still need to protect them during the colder months if you have them.

There are many coat styles attached to the Havanese. Some owners prefer to show off the length by naturally brushing out the coat. This option is called “corded,” which is the equivalent to dreadlocks on humans. It’s not the easiest style for a beginner, so consult a professional if you haven’t done it yet.

Havanese Breed – The Markings

All Havanese dogs will have a black nose with black pigment around the eyes. Actually there is one exception; the chocolate Havanese. These offer a brown pigmentation instead of the black. However, the list of coat colors is quite long. Here are some of the options available:

  • Black
  • Blue
  • Brown
  • Cream
  • Fawn
  • Orange
  • Silver
  • White

Demeanor and Temperament

If you’re looking for a family dog that loves to play, the Havanese is a great option. They are smart, easily trainable (especially when young), and they will stick with their habits as they age. Havanese have always had a tendency to become very attached to their owners, but they do like a little “me” time if possible.

They are also considered to be a very low maintenance dog. You don’t have to worry about regularly exercising them, nor do they feel the need to be vocal every time someone passes by the house. Also, if you need to keep your Havanese outdoors, they don’t mind it at all, but they definitely prefer indoor environments.

Another benefit to the Havanese is being able to use them as conversational pieces. They love to perform for a crowd, so your guests will really enjoy what they have to offer. However, one of their traits is having this “run-like-hell” attitude for a short period of time. All of the sudden the Havanese will start growling and hissing, then race back and forth throughout the house. By the time you know what is happening, the event is over and they are back to their normal self.

Their Health Potential

While all dog owners hope for a healthy pet, sometimes the breed is known for certain ailments or conditions. The good news is; the Havanese can live up to 16 years and sometimes longer. Here is a list of issues you could see in your new pet:

  • Heart Disease
  • Cataracts
  • Liver Disease
  • Luxating Patella
  • Retinal Dysplasia
  • Tear Stains

Luxating Patella is when the kneecap dislocates or seems to move out of its normal area. It’s a common condition in dogs, especially smaller breeds like the Havanese. You will be able to notice it within the first four to six months.

Since all of these diseases and conditions could cause issues now or down the road, it’s a good idea to utilize the Havanese Club of America. They provide 7 different tests for the following:

  • Cardiac Diseases
  • Congenital Deafness
  • Elbow Dysplasia
  • Eye Disease
  • Hip Dysplasia
  • Hip Joint Disorder
  • Patella Luxation

There are also tests conducted by the Canine Health Information Center. When the tests are complete, The CHIC will report the results for the Havanese breed. You can also find a variety of other places that will test your pet for diseases and disorders. The easiest way is by scheduling an appointment with your local vet.

The Working Dog

A lot of owners don’t realize that the Havanese breed is used for a variety of jobs. Most of them usually involve the public. Here is a quick list of various jobs we’ve seen the Havanese in:

  • Assistance dogs
  • Mold and termite detection
  • Therapy
  • Tracking

The Sporty Dog

While your Havanese dog can be utilized in several different ways, they are extremely agile. You can usually find them in dog sports around the world, especially with their springy step. Some of the sports you will find them in are:

  • Dog agility
  • Fly ball
  • Musical Canine Freestyle

Taking Care of your Havanese Dog

Owning a Havanese is definitely fun, and it doesn’t take too much to care for them. The rule of thumb is to comb them at least twice per week, and trim them if you don’t consider them a show dog. When they do get groomed (read more about grooming here), most Havanese owners will utilize a 1 to 2 inch cut for easier maintenance.

Now, if you let your Havanese play outdoors, chances are they’re going to get a little messy. During the winter time, any Havanese playing in the snow could get ice clumps stuck between their paw pads. In order to fix this, run their paws under luke warm water.

Eventually you will have to give them a bath as well. Anytime a dog gets a bath, they have to get washed and dried thoroughly. Any shampoo left on their coat could irritate the skin. Also, when dogs are left wet, it’s much harder to maintain their hair.

Another area of concern is the ears. You don’t want your Havanese to get an ear infection, so they must be kept clean at all times. This can easily be done by placing a cotton ball inside each ear before giving them a bath.

Havanese Breed – The Guard Dog

Well, the Havanese won’t give you the same type of safety comfort as a German Sheppard, but they will alert you when others are approaching. They really don’t speak much either, so if you tell them “Okay” or “Thank You,” they will probably stop yapping.

If you’re looking for a new pet for your home, the Havanese dog is a great choice. All you have to do is know how to take care of them and treat them good. After all, they are definitely “man’s (woman’s) best friend.”

Once you have found the ideal Havanese breeder, it’s time to start selecting the right Havanese Puppy. There are plenty of different angles you can take here, and some of it will depend on the type of dog you want the Havanese puppy to be. They offer several different traits that are fun, caring, and entertaining, but without the proper research you could end up with one that isn’t nearly like the rest.

Today we’ve put together several different ways you can select the right Havanese puppy. While some of them might not be for you, we want to list as many as possible. This way you can choose the Havanese puppy that is perfect for your home.

Havanese Puppies

Once you have found the ideal Havanese breeder, it’s time to start selecting the right Havanese Puppy. There are plenty of different angles you can take here, and some of it will depend on the type of dog you want the Havanese puppy to be. They offer several different traits that are fun, caring, and entertaining, but without the proper research you could end up with one that isn’t nearly like the rest.

Today we’ve put together several different ways you can select the right Havanese puppy. While some of them might not be for you, we want to list as many as possible. This way you can choose the Havanese puppy that is perfect for your home. Read more about Havanese Puppies here

 

The Havana Silk Dog

Through many years and generations of breeding, The Havana Silk Dog the breed has proven true and in line with Cuba’s ancient breed.
The fully pedigreed Havana Silk is a dog that’s specifically bred for to be a beautiful dog, and to improve the health within the Havanese. When you compare the Havenese to a silk dog the silk has a much silkier and flatter coat that certainly looks different from the American Havanese. After years researching Dr. Keith Murphy stated that we know that Havana Silk Dogs are genetically different from the Havanese.

The Havana Silk is know for its gorgeous coat that is silky and smooth, a bouncy gait, straight forelegs,and an upper arm that is short. Authentic Havana Silk Dogs are registered and certified by the HSDAA.

Certification To be allowed certification /full registration the dogs must go through a demanding hands on assessment by a certified Havana Silk Dog Evaluato
All Havana Silk Dogs meet the AKC standard of the Havanese, but not all Havanese are able to satisfy the standard for an Havana Silk Dog.

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